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A shout-out to Wakefield Post Office

July 26th,2023 | Valley Voices

By Hillary Jocelyn

I collect my mail from a stack of impersonal mailboxes, where I usually find bills, junk mail and rarely any nice surprises. But last week something amazing happened that shows me that the spirit of being a caring community is indeed alive and well and thriving at the Wakefield Post Office.

Many months ago, I ordered a book from a small independent bookseller. I was trying to write a very short play for the Wakefield Writers Fête at the time, and I had hoped the book might help me with the mysterious and unfamiliar process called Verbatim Theatre. The book never arrived, and to be honest, it sat at the back of my busy mind, where I mostly forgot about it. March, April, May, June… Then, a week or so ago, I met with some of the other playwrights and actors to reflect on our playwriting and performing process. One of them told me that there was a parcel for me at the Wakefield Post Office. What? How? When? As if? 

I called the post office the next day to follow up on this mystery. I mean, usually if I have a parcel, I get a slip in my mailbox telling me to come to the village and pick it up.

This was their heartwarming story.

Yes, they had received a small package for me several months ago, but it didn’t have my address on it, just my name, so they couldn’t deliver it because they had no idea who I was or where I lived. They returned it to the sender, who promptly sent it back to the post office.

What to do next with the package that was sitting on their counter with only a name on it? That was when the good ole Low Down stepped up to the plate. They had written a piece about the play, including the names and photos of a few of us playwrights. The staff person at the post office happened to read the paper, to see the article, and amazingly, to recognize my name as the one on the unclaimed parcel. It turned out that she also recognized one of the other playwrights, who was a regular customer, and so she was able to ask her to let me know that my long lost and unclaimed package was waiting expectantly for me at the post office.

Bingo!

A big shout-out to the staff at the post office, who went above and beyond, to facilitate a happy reunion between me and the book I ordered in February. And thanks to all the other players in this saga. 

Hilary Jocelyn is a playwright/actor and lives in Lascelles.

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At the Low Down, we are passionate about delivering quality local news to Gatineau Hills residents. But passion alone cannot pay the bills.

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