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Wakefield community centre transfer: What does it mean?

June 12th,2024 | News

Q: Explain the role of the municipality and the role of the Centre Wakefield-La Pêche cooperative under the transfer agreement

A: The COOP will continue to design, implement and execute artistic, recreational and cultural programming. It will be entitled to use the premises free of charge for its activities. It will assume all housekeeping, cleaning, computer, and any other costs associated with the activities or events. The municipality will assume all fees and other costs related to the building transfer. It assumes all costs associated with the building, such as building maintenance and repair, cleaning costs for the common areas, electricity, HVAC, telecommunication infrastructure, security, fixed equipment maintenance, grounds maintenance, and snow removal.

Q: Will the cooperative be forced to share revenue generated from events with the municipality?

A: No, the municipality will assure the coop of peaceful enjoyment of the premises. 

Q: How will the cooperative ensure that it has full control of programming in the future?

A: The transfer agreement will include the stipulation for full autonomy on the programming in the future.

Q: If the municipality becomes the owner of the building, will it have the power to mandate more French programming because of Bill 96?

A: Quebec’s language law, Bill 96, has implications for most organizations throughout Quebec. However, the municipality has no role or responsibility in monitoring or enforcing this piece of Quebec legislation, even if it becomes the owner of the building. 

Q: Will Bill 96 affect the way the centre runs in any way? If it has more than 25 employees, will the centre be forced to comply with Quebec’s francization requirement?

A: The coop is responsible for adhering to Bill 96 and other language laws of the Province of Quebec, such as in signage, advertising, and legal documentation. This will not change. The coop has a mission and vision that informs its operations and planning. It is not conceivable that the coop would ever have more than 10 employees, many of whom would be part-time. Therefore, the francization requirements for organizations with more than 25 employees would likely never apply. The municipality has its own obligations to follow regarding Bill 96 as outlined on its website.

Q: How long is the agreement for? Can the municipality sell the building or change its use in the future? Is the agreement in perpetuity?

A: The intent is to negotiate a legal agreement to be in perpetuity, with a condition whereby the building cannot be sold or its use changed.

Q: How can members ensure they are eligible to vote on June 20?

A: The date for the [vote] is June 20. Instructions were provided to members in the invitation. All active members may vote on June 20 unless they joined after May 20 of this year. Members are welcome to call the centre to validate their membership status.

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