loader image

La Maison des Collines turns five

May 6th,2024 | News

The anniversary celebration is a chance for La Maison des Collines to remind the community about their work and thank everyone for all their support, says Logan Vaillant, the centre’s executive director. Photo courtesy La Maison des Collines

By Arty Sarkisian

La Maison des Collines, which can be translated as “House of the Hills,” has helped more than 400 people spend “the last moments of their lives” as comfortably as possible. 

“I think a lot of people hear about La Maison des Collines without exactly knowing what it is,” says Maison des Collines Director-general Logan Vaillant. “And we say we do palliative care and life support. But until you hear the impact that actually has on people’s lives, I think it’s a very foreign concept.”

He says that for those who have never experienced the death of loved ones, it can be hard to understand the importance of having “the last moments of their lives be as comfortable as possible.”

The palliative care home, which has six private beds for patients, is turning five-years-old this month and is hosting a big party May 10 to say thanks to its supporters over the past half-decade. 


“Naturally, we want to celebrate the fact that we turned five, and we want to thank everyone who’s been involved,” says Vaillant. “And part of it is also because we want to show people what their contributions go towards.”

The Wakefield palliative care home has been a saving grace for some families struggling to care for their ailing and aging relatives, according to Vaillant. The home offers 24-hour care through a team of doctors, social workers, nurses, caregivers, care volunteers and support staff who work in unison to keep their patients comfortable as they near the end of their lives. Loved ones are also warmly welcomed into the home and cared for by the support team, according to Vaillant. More than 400 patients have spent their final days at La Maison. 

Some staff and volunteers will be speaking at the event to give a bit of history of the centre and tell the community “why we’re grateful that we are so supported,” explains Vaillant.

In the end, Vaillant says they will honour “a very special guest” and have a surprise for the community that he wouldn’t reveal. 

“The community center can receive up to 250 people,” says Vaillant. “I’m hoping we get between 100 to 150.”

The event is also another chance to sign up to become one of the volunteers at La Maison des Collines.

Vaillant says there are twice as many volunteers as staff members, and they are always looking for more people to help. Tickets for the event are free, but can be reserved online. Visit the website at https://www.lamaisondescollines.org/ for more information. 

Latest Headlines

News

HELLO SUMMER!

THE LOW Down is on holidays!

The office will be closed from July 10 to July 23. There will be NO EDITION published on July 17 or 24. Our next edition will be on July 31.

News

A fiery 40th

Wakefield’s treasured wooden bridge – a village icon that had spanned the Gatineau River for 69 years – was a fiery inferno. Villagers were out on their docks or scattered along the riverbank, watching the structure crack and bust apart span by span – many of them, like Garnett and her partner, Norma Walmsley, aghast as the violent flames tore through the nearly 90 metres of wood in a matter of minutes. It was precisely 40 years ago from this edition’s publication date. 

Letters

Hills peace and justice group giving us hope

The Editor, In response to Stephanie Turple’s “Upholding western values” (July 3 edition) and what the group Hills for Peace and Justice calls (H4P&J) “‘genocide and colonization’” (June 12 edition) As per the March 26, UN Human Rights Council’s reasonable...

Hard-hitting local news delivered right to your mailbox (or in your inbox!)

Support feisty, independent journalism.

 

At the Low Down, we are passionate about delivering quality local news to Gatineau Hills residents. But passion alone cannot pay the bills.

To help meet the demands of inflation and the costs of producing fact-based local news, we have introduced new pricing options. Our goal is to meet readers where they’re at, and keep our newspaper as affordable as possible.

Print + Digital Subscriptions

Digital Subscription

Support feisty, independent journalism.

 

At the Low Down, we are passionate about delivering quality local news to Gatineau Hills residents. But passion alone cannot pay the bills.

To help meet the demands of inflation and the costs of producing fact-based local news, we have introduced new pricing options. Our goal is to meet readers where they’re at, and keep our newspaper as affordable as possible.

Print + Digital Subscriptions

Digital Subscription